Chief Victims Advisor

UPDATE 21 September: Courts and tribunals are operating differently at the moment. Please do not come to the courthouse if you are feeling unwell. Contact 0800 COURTS (0800 268 787) if you cannot enter the courthouse or are not sure whether to attend.

Find contact details for a court or tribunal

Attending a court or tribunal

Auckland at Level 2

Please attend on your scheduled date unless a Judge or Registrar has advised otherwise.

Entry into courthouses is limited to defendants, parties, witnesses, complainants, victims, and other stakeholders. Members of the public (including whānau/support person for a defendant) whose presence is not required at court may only attend if granted permission from the presiding Judge.

Public counters are generally open.

Protocols for how courts and tribunals will operate during COVID-19 Alert Level 2 have been released on the Courts of NZ website

Rest of New Zealand at Level 1

Please attend on your scheduled date unless a Judge or Registrar has advised otherwise.

Members of the public can attend without prior permission from the presiding Judge.

Public counters are generally open.

Protocols for how courts and tribunals will operate during COVID-19 Alert Level 1 have been released on the Courts of NZ website

Health and safety measures

We are following Ministry of Health guidelines to protect the health and safety of all court participants and staff.

Factsheet: Health and Safety measures during COVID-19 Alert Level 2 [PDF, 90KB]

Factsheet: Health and Safety measures during COVID-19 Alert Level 1 [PDF, 85KB]

Juror safety

Arrangements are in place to keep jurors safe in court buildings throughout New Zealand.

Read the Chief Justice's media statement 18 September 2020 re jury trial arrangements [PDF, 412KB]

Use of face masks in court buildings

Face masks should be worn while in public areas of Auckland court buildings until further notice. This applies to all court participants and staff to maintain health and safety standards. It is an additional precaution for everyone in the court building. Disposable masks are freely available from security at court entrances.

For the rest of New Zealand, face mask use is encouraged in court buildings.

Judicial protocols have been updated to reflect this on the Courts of New Zealand website.

Read the Chief Justice's media statement 28 August 2020 regarding masks in court

 

Christchurch Mosque attacks: Information for victims

The Victims Information website has information on support and resources for victims, families and those affected by the attacks on the two Christchurch Mosques on 15 March 2019.

Christchurch Mosque attacks: Information for victims

Chief Victims Advisor Media Statement 27 August 2020 on RvT sentencing

Kia ora koutou

"When victims' voices are heard throughout the justice system, everyone benefits."
Dr Kim McGregor

Welcome to the website of the office of the Chief Victims Advisor to Government. Please click on the headings below if you want to find out further information.

Let me introduce myself. My name is Kim McGregor and I was appointed as the inaugural Chief Victims Advisor in November 2015.

Strengthening the Criminal Justice System for Victims survey

This survey is now closed. Here are some closing remarks from Dr Kim McGregor.

  • Biography

    I have over thirty years’ experience as a therapist, advocate, trainer and researcher.

  • The Chief Victims Advisor role

    My role is to provide independent advice to the Minister of Justice about victim issues, especially focusing on improving systems, policies and laws for victims within the justice sector.

  • Priorities

    When developing my advice, I research and consult as widely as possible.

  • Victims, rights & the justice system

    In line with the Victims’ Rights Act 2002 and the Victims Code 2015, my role is to promote the provision of information and support for victims of crime.

Strengthening the Criminal Justice System for Victims survey

The Strengthening the Criminal Justice System for Victims survey is now closed. I’d like to say a big thank you to all of you who responded or promoted the survey through your networks. In total over 600 people participated in the survey, over 500 of which said they had experienced a crime, and over 400 of those individuals reported their experience to the justice system. This survey was an opportunity for people who have experienced crime to tell us their views, what works and what doesn’t work in the criminal justice system and how it can be improved. The responses will now be collated and analysed with a final report to be released in the coming months. The findings will be used to inform the Hāpaitia te Oranga Tangata Safe and Effective Justice reform programme, and my advice to Government on how to improve the system for victims/survivors. I would like to once again reiterate my personal gratitude to those who have shared their voices, views and stories. I recognise the bravery that it took to share that with us. Thank you.

I believe victims should be at the heart of the criminal justice system. We need to strengthen our systems to enable victims to tell us about the abuse, trauma and losses they have experienced, so that we can acknowledge their experiences and prevent further victimisation and/or revictimisation. When we put victims at the heart of our system there are potential benefits not just for the individual, but for all in our communities.

Challenges with the term 'victim'

A lot of people dislike the term ‘victim’ however some find the term ‘victim’ validates the harm they have experienced. Some people prefer the term ‘survivor’. Others dislike that term and prefer to be described as ‘a person who has been victimised’ or not to be labelled at all. For now, I use the term ‘victim’ for the sake of consistency with legislation and other agencies in the justice system. The term ‘victim’ is not meant as a value judgment on those who have experienced crime, or to exclude those who do not identify with that term.

We are further developing our website to incorporate Te Reo Māori and other languages to reflect the diversity in Aotearoa.